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Delaware County, NY Genealogy and History Site

Here is a summary that was contained in a speech by Nick Maffett, Liberty, Sullivan Co. More info from History of Sullivan County, James Eldridge Quinlan, Liberty, 1873, includes: In 1707, Major Johannes Hardenburgh, a merchant of Kingston, Ulster Co., purchased from the Indians for the sum of 60 pounds "the immense tract of land now known as the Hardenburgh Patent," which includes all of what is now known as Sullivan Co. and parts of Delaware and Ulster Counties. On 20 Apr 1708, the patent was officially granted to Hardenburgh and six associates. By a secret understanding, and additioanl eighth-share was granted to the Surveyor-General of the Province, Augustus Graham, who could not legally have an interest in a land grant. Over the next 40 years, the make-up of the proprietors changed substantially due to deaths and sales. In 1749, the patent was divided into "Great Lots" apportioned by lot among the proprietors. These were further subdivided into tracts and divisions of various sizes.

The maps from the county offices showing these divisions are invaluable if you get into the deeds. --Bob Boyd, April 5, 2001


BACKGROUND - HARDENBURGH PATENT

One hundred years have passed since, by an act of the Legislature of the State of New York, Liberty was declared to be a town in a section of country now called Sullivan County, but, at that time, it was a part of Ulster County. Sullivan County was formed from Ulster, March 27, 1809, or two years later. It was so named in honor of Major General Sullivan of the Revolutionary War.

In 1708, Johannes Hardenburgh, of Kingston, Ulster County, was granted a great tract of land known as the Hardenburgh Patent. It included all of what is now Sullivan County and a portion of Delaware. Later this tract was divided into smaller tracts and apportioned among his heirs.

Capt George Broadhead, living in Marbletown, Ulster County, received 3,000 acres, which included a portion of the present town of Liberty including also what was called the Blue Mountain Country. The south line extended nearly east & west through what is now Liberty Village.

They built a road to travel back and forth in order to get their corn and products to Kingston for grinding, etc. They traveled by wagon. Snow was terrible in those years.

(Remarks by Nicholas D. Maffett, 1909. Provided by Leah Studt.)




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